Aggressive Transparency

aggressive transparency I came across a new phrase last week, which I really like:  “aggressive transparency”. I saw this phrase in the Project Management Institute, Inc. exposure draft of A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) – Sixth Edition.  It is used in the Project Stakeholder Management chapter referring to the fact that agile approaches strive to be very transparent so that stakeholders always are aware of project progress.  I liked the phrase and searched on it to see if I could find where it originated. Continue reading

Posted in Aggressive Transparency, Agile, Leadership, Organizational Changes, PMI, Team Collaboration | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Prioritization Troubles? Brainstorm New Metrics

We teach prioritization techniques in many of our classes and many of the conversations we have at conferences and meetings are about how challenging it can be to get a group of people to agree on project priorities or even individual aspects of a product. As I was working on my 2017 strategic plan, I decided to write a short post on prioritization and metrics.

As a program manager at RMC Learning Solutions I have to prioritize projects and make recommendations to my management. We have many ideas for new courses, products, and services which are competing for our time. Prioritizing requires us to assess the expected value of an idea against its expected cost and then compare it to other ideas. Continue reading

Posted in Agile, Prioritization, Training & Development | Leave a comment

What Good Are Certifications, Anyway?

What Good Are Certifications, Anyway?It seems that certifications are under attack.  In the past several months I’ve heard that corporations are no longer interested in having their employees obtain any certifications.   This rant is not limited to the PMP®.  Indeed, it is said that companies are now solely interested in skills training. On one level this makes sense.  Why should a company care whether their employees are certified project managers, business analysts or Scrum Masters so long as they are able to perform those functions? What good are certifications, anyway?

Continue reading

Posted in Agile, Business Analysis, Project Management, Training & Development | 2 Comments

Making the Most of Your Conference Attendance

I’m going to the BBC Conference (Building Business Capability) next week and am really looking forward to the sessions, the exhibit hall, and networking with other professionals.  I realize that I am fortunate to be able to attend several conferences each year, but I know many people are lucky if they get to go to one. If you are going the BBC or another conference, make the most of it. Here are some tips for preparing to attend a conference which will help you get the most value. Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Last Minute Hints to Passing the CBAP®/CCBA® Exam

Time pressure. Deadline. Businessman trying to stop time. Time Management. “What should I do to pass before the deadline?”

So you waited until the last month to take your CBAP® or CCBA® Exam? I won’t lecture you on procrastination (although I am very tempted to!).  I have been getting quite a few questions from people trying to finish by Sept. 22, 2016 when the IIBA® BABOK® Guide V2 exams expire. Continue reading

Posted in Business Analysis, Business Analyst, Exam Prep | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

PMI-PBA® Evaluation Domain

Evaluation

Evaluation

This is the fifth and final post in a series about the PMI-PBA® certification. The last exam area is the Evaluation domain and includes the work necessary to make sure the solution is ready for the stakeholders, and that it delivers the value expected. This is the last domain in the PMI-PBA exam content outline which includes Needs Assessment, Planning, Analysis, and Traceability and Monitoring. Solution evaluation is where all of the work of the project comes together. Business analysis work in this domain assures that the solution is ready for use in the business area. To make sure it is ready, it must be thoroughly tested, the end users must be ready to use it, and the organization must be prepared for its impacts. Business analysts are important team members in this work. Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

PMI-PBA® Traceability and Monitoring Domain

2-6_4-16_key_concepts-traceability_matrix

This is the fourth post in a series about the PMI-PBA certification. The Traceability and Monitoring domain follows the Analysis domain and includes much of the business analysis work that is traditionally called Requirements Management. Continue reading

Posted in Business Analysis, Business Analyst, Domains, Exam Prep, PMI, PMI-PBA®, Requirements, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Importance of Team Dynamics

Listening to everyone’s excitement yesterday over the win of the NBA title of Cleveland over Oakland was great.  I thought the sportscaster I listened to made a very astute observation.  While everyone believes LeBron James is a great player, maybe the best in the league, this person’s observation was that Oakland was made up of better players but that Cleveland actually has a better team.

That’s a great comment and one that is likely quite true. Continue reading

Posted in Agile, Leadership, Management, Training & Development | 2 Comments

Certification Exam Preparation: Understanding Beats Memorization

Understanding vs. Memorization
Why does RMC focus on understanding rather than memorization?  As RMC’s project management practice leader I’m often asked: “why can’t I just memorize the process names, inputs, tools, techniques, and outputs (ITTOs) and pass the exam?” The answer to this question is quite simple.  Understanding works, memorization does not, especially in the context of the PMP® exam. Let’s discuss understanding vs. memorization. Continue reading

Posted in PMP®, Project Management | Leave a comment

Death by a Thousand “Little Mistakes”

Paying attention to the details is good business analysis

How many little mistakes do you see?
I open the newspaper in the morning and see a typo. I open my email and see a grammatical error. I go to a web site and a menu button doesn’t work. How many “little mistakes” do you see in a day? Corporations are pushing employees to work faster and get products to market sooner. Is this agile or is this sloppy? Many companies sacrifice analysis and attention to detail to increase revenue but it won’t pay off in the long run. Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment